National Consumer News

Target pulls girls’ T-shirt after parents complain of offensive message


Cox Media Group National Content Desk 

Target Australia received backlash for a girls’ T-shirt that it was selling when parents called the message on the shirt “offensive” and insulting.

The powder-pink shirt chronicled the “Batgirl to-do list:” Dry-clean cape, wash Batmobile, fight crime, save the world.”

Some parents criticized the message, saying that it perpetuated gender stereotypes by suggesting a female complete chores before getting out to do more meaningful work.

“I’m insulted that you present a future where our daughters need to complete their ‘home duties’ before they can go out and save the world,” a Melbourne mother, Ninac Ollins, wrote on Target Australia’s Facebook page. “We know that working mothers still do more housework than their spouses,. We don’t need you to perpetuate this inequity.”

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Another user, Summer Edwards, said the T-shirt’s message “is utterly offensive and must be removed.”



“Target, your Batgirl T-shirt is out of step with 21st century family values,” Edwards wrote.

“In a world where so many are fighting so hard for equality for our daughters, you put this on your shelves?” customer Shelley Wedemeyer asked the retailer.

Dozens of other customers and parents said they didn’t see an issue with the shirt.

A Target Australia representative responded on behalf of the company, saying: “Thanks for sharing your feedback with us. It absolutely wasn’t our intention to cause any offense with this shirt, so we really appreciate you all getting in touch with us to let us know your thoughts. We’ve taken this feedback on board, and sincerely apologize for any disappointment caused.”

The shirt was later pulled from stores.

“After reviewing and reading our customers’ concerns on the Batgirl tee, we have decided to remove the shirt from our stores. It was never Target’s intention to offend our customers with this item,” a spokeswoman told The Guardian.

Target Australia has no connection to the U.S. version of Target, according to Mashable.

The “Today” show pointed out that other messages on children’s clothing have roused similar sentiments, including an Old Navy shirt that called boys “Ghostbusters” while girls were “Ghostbusters in training.”

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