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Aquafina, Dasani, Nestle Pure Life contaminated with plastic particles

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By Fiza Pirani, Atlanta Journal-Constitution

That water bottle you just purchased is likely contaminated with microplastic particles, according to a new investigation from researchers at the State University of New York at Fredonia and journalism organization Orb Media.

Through an analysis of 259 water bottles from 11 brands sold across nine countries, including the United States, scientists found 93 percent were contaminated with an average of 10.4 plastic particles per liter of water. That’s twice the amount of contamination typically found in tap water.

  • 90% of all bottled water contains tiny plastic particles http://wef.ch/2ph1fyr 

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    Tests on major brands of bottled water have found that nearly all of them contained tiny particles of plastic http://bbc.in/2GwVnIM 

    Major brand names such as Aquafina, Dasani, Evian, Nestle Pure Life and San Pellegrino were among the water bottles tested.

    “In this study, 65 percent of the particles we found were actually fragments and not fibers,” lead researcher Sherri Mason told AFP.

    According to the research, the plastic debris found in the water bottles included polypropylene, nylon and polyethylene terephthalate, which is used to make bottle caps. The particles are likely a result of the industrial bottling and plastic packaging process.

    But the effects of these chemicals on human health, scientists say, are still unclear.

    “As much as 90 percent of ingested plastic could pass through a human body, but some of it may end up lodged in the gut, or traveling through the lymphatic system, according to research by the European Food Safety Authority,” Time reported.

    Previous research has linked synthetic chemicals often found in plastic to “certain kinds of cancer to lower sperm count to increases in conditions like ADHD and autism,” Mason said, prompting calls for further studies on the possible health implications of plastics pollution.

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